Can one prepare for a school shooting like at Stoneman Douglas High School?

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Personally, I feel if I don’t prepare for a transition then I am working so hard to keep my head above water that I never learn how to swim.  When I read, once again, about this horrific school shooting tragedy I felt helpless and frustrated. My heart goes out to those who died, and those who survived, and the many others who have already been through this situation. And then,  I began looking online for something about preparing for a school shooting.

I did not look for or find everything that has been written or shared. This is not like looking for a well-written book or engaging game. How do I apply the idea of my logical method to a situation that makes me cringe and feel horrified in every part of my being?

I did find a website and an article. They each expressed how overwhelmingly large and complicated this situation is, and how preparing for being in the situation is no way a guarantee of anything. I totally agree. Preparing does not guarantee you will do an outstanding job of going through it. And, yet, preparing means you have thought about the situation, and on some level have put yourself into the scenario. It means you can look at strategies, however simple, and recognize that thinking on your feet is actually a strength.

I have always wondered something about the NYC 911 tragedy. Did some of the people survive because they used the elevator to get down, going against our lifelong training about never getting in an elevator if there is a fire? I don’t know.

StudentCaffe has presented a factual plan with no promises. Preparing For the Worst: School Shootings (http://studentcaffe.com/thrive/student-safety/school-shootings). USA Today (2/16/18) offers: Why active shooter training didn’t help in the Florida high  school shooting   (https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/02/16/active-shooter-training-florida/343641002/) quotes Michael Dorn who consults to schools about safety, “Most importantly, staff should be taught using "scenario-based training" so that they can learn to react and deviate from the plan in place when what they see and hear suggests that following the plan would be more dangerous.”

I am humbled by the words of the young survivors of this horrific situation. They have chosen to articulately set out to use their pain to hopefully nudge our country to make an important transition. Some have made comments about recognizing danger even when the adults in charge did not. I listened to a teacher talk candidly about what carrying and using a gun at school would feel like. I feel sad that places that are supposed to help us learn and grow, are also places where we can be killed.

Preparing for a tragedy like this means accepting it can happen, and talking about actions you would take if it does. Logically, realistically. Perhaps, doing that would teach us how to swim, and help us keep our head above water.